Thursday, September 6, 2007

The Power Of Dreams

Modern day research began with the discovery of rapid eye movement during sleep. A creative dream experiences by the 18th century Italian composer Giuseppe Tartini refutes the notion that the opium and not coleridge deserves the credit for ''Kubia Khan.'' Professor Carl Jung believed dreams and fantasies revealed inherently recognizable symbols. Dreams of disaster seem to overshadow all other precognitive dreams. Shakespeare wrote of the dreams that haunted Richard the third on the night before he died in battle and of Calournia's dream of the death of her husband Julius Caesar.

Hitler while on the front in World War 1, is said to have dreamed that his position would be buried and to have moved away in time to escape. The death of Archduke Francis Ferdinand, has been foreshadowed in a dream by a tutor. Abraham Lincoln dreamed of seeing his coffin just days before he died.

Registry for Prophetic Dreams

To cope with the greatest frustration of any investigator of prophetic dreams- that the prove only to be retrospect. Robert Nelson established his Central Premonition Registry in the year of 1968. To date, the registry has received descriptions of about 8,000 dreams, and of thse, Nelson has found 48 that bear a recognizable and detailed similarity to events that occurred after a particular dream had been registered with him. One xample of a hit was recored by a Ohio woman who dreamed of the crash of a light plane at an airport near her home.


In her dream the plane appeared to be damaged, possibly from hitting another plane or a pole. About nine days after this dream had been recorded, newspapers carried the story of the death of a local attorney in a very similar crash. A propeller was bent when the plane ''began to dip to the left'', the ''hit the top of a floodwall alongside the airport.'' The dreamer had envisoned ''three like soldiers crawling on the ground.'' In fact, three of the four people in the plane survived.

Dr. Montahue Ullman did experiments in 1965 with an affort to transmit specific images telepathically into the minds of sleeping subjects. The subjects REM sleep and electrical brain activity were monitored, and before the REM phase passes, the subject was awakened and asked to record a description of his dream. Th overall ration of his misses was not overwhelmingly impressive. Yet what was impressive was the uncanny accuracy of some of the hits that Ullman reported. In a faw of the cases he presented, dreamers described highly complex target images in such near-perfect detail that the results seemed to defy any explanation but telepathy.

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