Wednesday, April 16, 2008

A black hole in big bang

A black hole in big bang

user posted image rAnthony North: Big Bang happened like this. Once upon a time there was a 'singularity' that contained everything that was. Suddenly it blew up, releasing fundamental particles that expanded to fill space. Gravity came into being and particles came together into stars and planets. More complicated particles were 'cooked' in the stars, and were released through supernova, to form other heavenly bodies, and from them eventually came life. The theory is neat and tidy.: It came out of the realization that the universe was expanding, and when background radiation was found, identified as residue of the Big Bang, the theory gained consensus. Of course, there are massive problems with the theory. The 'singularity' is nothing but a mathematical point of infinity, with no physical validity, and the math of the theory means there is 90% of the matter and energy in the universe missing. Exotic theories come and go to account for this lack of universal weight.: Dark matter and dark energy are among them. Then there is the search for 'mass' in massless particles. It doesn't occur to science that the theory may be wrong. Previous to Big Bang was the Steady State theory. Here, matter was continually created, the universe renewing itself. But as no means was known how it did this, it was rejected for Big Bang, even though no one knows how it did this. Big bang fits western philosophy.: In the east, everything is cyclical, renewing itself, whilst in the west, we are linear. Things must move from a beginning to an end.

Hence, it follows that the universe must also have history with a beginning and an end. Is this philosophical mind-set the main reason we prefer Big Bang over Steady State? After all, neither can be proved. Of course, the argument is that background radiation seals it. But in other areas of science, it is accepted that nothing can have only one answer. It seems to me that big bang theory has got itself in a steady state.: And maybe it's time to look again at Steady State itself.

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