Tuesday, July 24, 2007

The Mind-Body Problem

Currently Neuroscience believes that out consciousness is a by product of electrical chemical activity going on in the brain [The Production Theory. There is a another theory though it's called the receiver/transmission theory it says that are brain receives the mind and that our mind/soul is a signal that is being picked up from the Aether background medium.

Three are three different views on the mind-body problem

Materialism- Only physical things exists mind is just a by product of the brain

Idealism- Everything is Mind and that matter is a illusion

Dualism- Matter and Mind are both real they interact but are also distinct from one another.


Now I accept Dualism in the form of

Substance Dualism
Substance dualists argue that the mind is an independently existing substance




Mind Distinguished from Brain

If the physical/material universe is all there is, then every facet of occultism (which necessarily occurs in a nonphysical universe) is simply a delusion. There is, however, far too much evidence in support of so-called ESP, telekinesis, precognition, poltergeist activity and other forms of evidence for life after death allow one to accept materialistic dogma. Carl Rogers eventually confessed that "mind is an entity far greater than brain…"11 Recognizing that consciousness could not be explained by materialism, Rogers realized the consequences and on that basis predicted the imminent practical application of "such paranormal phenomena as telepathy, clairvoyance, precognition... healing energies… the power of meditation, transcendent forces.

The famous neurologist Wilder Penfield put it well: "The mind is independent of the brain. The brain is a computer, but it is programmed by something that is outside itself, the mind."13 Logically, if the mind/spirit/soul is independent of the brain, it could survive the death of the body. Carl Jung, reflecting upon whether the soul, which he called "the psyche," might survive physical death, wrote:

Total loss of consciousness can be accompanied by perceptions of the outside world and vivid dream experiences. Since the cerebral cortex, the seat of consciousness, is not functioning at these times, there is as yet no explanation for such phenomena. They may be evidence for at least a subjective persistence of the capacity for consciousness—even in a state of apparent unconsciousness.14

That some form of consciousness persists even when the brain is not functioning is evident from the many testimonies of those who have been declared brain dead and yet lived to describe in detail what was happening around them while they were being revived.

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